Tag Archives: Prince George

PGCPS Teen arrested in fatal University Park shooting

PGCPS Teen arrested in fatal University Park shooting

College Park, Md: (Reform Sasscer) – Prince George’s County police said Tuesday they’ve arrested a suspect in connection with a fatal shooting last year in University Park, Maryland.

Police said 18-year-old Andres Aguilar, of University Park, has been charged in connection with the shooting death of 19-year-old Luis Miguel Utrera, of Hyattsville, in November.

Utrera was found with a gunshot wound in the driver’s seat of a car that had struck a tree in the 4000 block of Underwood Street Nov. 17. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Authorities said it was a “drug-related robbery.”

Aguilar was arrested in D.C. on Jan. 19. He’s charged with first- and second-degree murder and other charges.

He’s being held in D.C. awaiting extradition to Prince George’s County.

At least 10 juveniles were killed last year in Prince George’s County, Maryland which was the worst year since 2008.

County Executive Alsobrooks has implored the community to come together to “disrupt the cycle of violence that is growing again.”

According to Alsobrooks, for example, there have been 162 carjackings in Prince George’s County. She acknowledged on during a press briefing on or around January 11 and said that juveniles are responsible for 96 of them.

“And so this tells us a lot about where we’re headed. And we must do something right now to disrupt it,” Alsobrooks said.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system. These willful violations include closing down schools ready for real estate option, paying off lawyers, siphoning money off to friends and family etc. Prince George’s county citizens must raise up and demand answers without delay. These out of control fights and other purposeful disregard are not fair to county residents, their families and United States.

Read more >>> ‘Hope in Action’: Prince George’s Co. launches new anti-crime effort

Read more >>> PGCPS Parent Fatally Shot in Front of his 3 Children, Girlfriend.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system. She is not responsive to parents needs and many are being blackballed within the system due to retaliation.

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Prince George’s Co. Public Schools budget proposal would consolidate alternative schools

PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md. (FOX 5 DC) – Some Prince George’s County students and staff say they were shocked to learn their schools are on the chopping block. FOX 5 has learned the PGCPS CEO’s budget proposal would consolidate the county’s alternative schools from five down to three.

Staff said they were caught off guard by the news and some board members said they were also surprised to see this in the budget plan for next school year.

The schools that would be consolidated under the plan are Tall Oaks Vocational High School in Bowie and Community Based Classroom, known as CBC, in Lanham.

Jade Mason, who attends CBC, said she just found out about this on Thursday.

“I was really shocked. Out of all the public schools I’ve been to, CBC is the last school I would close,” said Mason. “It’s so versatile and flexible. They work with you.”

She also provided some statements of support for the school by fellow students.

At Thursday’s school board meeting, several CBC staffers spoke against the proposal during public comment, saying the schools are important options for at-risk students.

CBC has a 95 percent graduation rate. English teacher Zena Whitworth, who spoke before the board, said these students could very well be left behind in a traditional school.

“For example, those students who suffer from anxiety, those students who have been bullied, those students who don’t do well because of the large class sizes,” said Whitworth.

She also mentioned students who’ve been involved in the criminal justice system and those who are parents. CBC has day and evening classes.

“What programs are you going to put in place for these types of students?” she asked.

FOX 5 reached out to PGCPS Thursday for additional details from CEO Dr. Monica Goldson, but we are still awaiting a response.

The budget offers few details about the plan and reasoning behind it, stating the five alternative schools would be restructured into a northern and southern high school location and one middle school program.

CEO Goldson was not at Thursday’s board meeting. The board chair said she’s on travel.

The school board will now amend the CEO’s budget before voting on it. There are several meetings in the coming weeks.

The first public hearing on the budget is on Jan. 27.

Via Fox 5 DC

CEO Goldson was not at Thursday’s board meeting. The board chair said she’s on travel.

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Alsobrooks Boasts $1.2M War Chest in Reelection Bid fueled by Developers and others.

Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks has a war chest of $1.2 million in her bid for reelection in the majority-Black jurisdiction which is fueled by outsiders and others.

Largo, Md, (Reform Sasscer) – Why has the Prince George’s County, Maryland become so thoroughly corrupt? The reason is historical—it goes back many decades—and, in a way, philosophical. The county leadership is best understood as an insurgency that carried the seeds of its own corruption from the start. This corruption continues to advance with the developers and other folks interested to lining up their own pockets in heavy toll. As a result, Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks has a war chest of $1.2 million in her bid for reelection in the majority-Black jurisdiction which is fueled by outsiders and others.

Though Alsobrooks hasn’t officially filed paperwork with the Maryland State Board of Elections, a campaign statement released Wednesday summarizes the Democrat’s plans to seek a second four-year term despite major fiasco sweeping the county schools. Allowing elected officials in Maryland to use campaign funds to pay for their legal defense is a “slap in the face” of efforts to reform the state’s corruption-plagued political culture,” stated a resident who wanted to remain anonymous.

The latest campaign finance report for Jan. 14, 2021 – Jan. 12, 2022 showed her campaign has raised nearly $702,000.

“I couldn’t be more grateful for the overwhelming amount you chose to invest in the vision that I have for Prince George’s County,” Alsobrooks said. “Please continue to volunteer for our campaign and tell friends about what we are doing. I need you more than ever to keep our momentum moving forward.”

A summary shows out of the 1,432 donations received, about 902 came from Prince George’s County. Approximately 823 donations came in at $100 or less.

A few of the major contributions:

• $6,000 from AES Electrical Inc. of Laurel.

• $6,000 from Gordon Barnaby, founder and president of BarnAllen Technologies of Rockville in Montgomery County.

• $5,000 from Bowie Trucking Service of Upper Marlboro.

• $2,500 from Andre Gingles, an attorney and owner of Gingles LLC in Laurel.

• $2,000 from EXP US Services Inc. of Chicago.

Meanwhile, four other Democratic candidates filed to run for county executive by the deadline on 11:59 p.m. Wednesday to file campaign finance reports online. If mailed, the reports needed to be postmarked on or before Wednesday.

Former NFL player and county native Leigh Bodden of Bowie has about $4,400 cash on hand, the second-highest amount in the race. He contributed about $1,000 to his campaign.

Sherman Hardy, a real estate agent and Air Force veteran of Clinton, raised $2,406 last year but with only $473 cash on hand.

Tonya Sweat, an attorney from Accokeek who also runs her own consulting firm and is well knowledgeable with the State and county issues, raised slightly more than $6,465 last year. However, her campaign finance report shows a deficit of $386. She will make a great county executive if given a chance.

“I still have a couple outstanding bills that need to be paid,” she said.

As she continues to campaign, Sweat has some advice for voters.

“If they want to stay in the same place they’re in right now, then that’s their right,” she said. “If they want change, then they need to stop and think about where the money’s coming from. Money doesn’t necessarily bring about change. It’s a resource and a tool we can use to get there, but if it’s not in the right hands, we’re not going to be any better off.”

As of 11 a.m. Thursday, a campaign finance report wasn’t online for Billy W. Bridges who has promised a robust campaign and he is aware of the issues as well. He sought the office in 2018 and made prayer in public schools a part of his campaign platform.

All prospective candidates have until Feb. 22 to file documents with the state elections board.

The winner of the June 28 Democratic primary is all but guaranteed victory in the general election with Democrats outnumbering Republicans 10 to 1 in the county. The jurisdiction with a population of 967,200 has the highest number of registered Democrats in the state.

County residents eligible to run for public offices are encouraged to vie as democrats’ for all open seats to challenge and beat the incumbents without delay this year. A few senators and delegates are okay. This is the only way to bring a positive change in Prince George’s county, Maryland.

Read more >>> PGCPS Parent Fatally Shot in Front of his 3 Children, Girlfriend.

Read more here >> Major Drama as Fights Break Out at Suitland High School and others.

Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks plans to seek a second four-year term despite major fiasco sweeping the county schools.

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Prince George’s Co. residents speak out on restructuring school board in public session

The Prince George’s County Public Schools headquarters in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines)

Upper Marlboro: Reform Sasscer – Residents of Prince George’s County, Maryland, shared their thoughts Wednesday on the kind of board they want to lead the county’s public school system.

The Board of Education Task Force, a panel formed to study restructuring the school board, hosted its second public listening session. Most of the residents who commented said they support the task force’s preliminary recommendation that the board abandon its current structure of nine elected and four appointed members in favor of an all-elected board.

“Democracy is always a little messy, but that’s OK, it’s still the best system that we have,” said an Upper Marlboro resident.

Another resident, Amity Pope, echoed similar sentiments.

“Stand firm in not disenfranchising the voters of Prince George’s County. A recommendation for a fully-elected school board is a vote for democracy,” Pope said.

While other public participants supported the idea of making the school board all-elected, some also offered the task force additional advice on improving its governance, thereby improving public schools.

“There needs to be some type of training so that they are properly trained and understand how things operate in a board structure … training in fiscal oversight, nonprofit management and governing skills,” said resident Tanya Wingfield.

One commenter suggested wholesale changes are needed at Prince George’s County Public Schools.

“We need to transform teachers’ pay. We need to transform curriculum for students. We need to transform those who are charged with leading our children,” said Dannine Johnson.

The task force is expected to finalize its recommendations next month in a county dotted by youth violence out of control.

At least 10 juveniles were killed last year in Prince George’s County, Maryland which was the worst year since 2008.

County Executive Alsobrooks has implored the community to come together to “disrupt the cycle of violence that is growing again.”

According to Alsobrooks, for example, there have been 162 carjackings in Prince George’s County. She acknowledged on Tuesday this week and said that juveniles are responsible for 96 of them.

“And so this tells us a lot about where we’re headed. And we must do something right now to disrupt it,” Alsobrooks said.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system. These willful violations include closing down schools ready for real estate option, paying off lawyers, siphoning money off to friends and family etc. Prince George’s county citizens must raise up and demand answers without delay. These out of control fights and other purposeful disregard are not fair to county residents, their families and United States.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out-of-control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system.

***

Save PGCPS Community Based Classroom Alternative High School NOW!!

Upper Marlboro, Saccer Building: – Reform Sasscer – A change.org petition has been launched to plead and reach out to the Prince George’s County Board of Education to stop the shut down of specialty alternative programs and specifically Community Based Classroom (CBC)! At risk youth need option!

It reads:   

“Community Based Classroom (CBC) alternative high school has been successfully working with at risk seniors to earn their high school diplomas since 1989. The school has graduated thousands of students that would not have received a high school diploma without this program in place. We cater to the at risk 5th and 6th year senior who failed to graduate at traditional high schools. 

The data speaks for itself! With a graduation rate of 95% and an attendance rate of 93% (school year 2019-20) it is clear that our program works! By providing highly qualified teachers to deliver engaging in person instruction our students are motivated to gain the skills they need to get their diplomas and make a plan for their futures. We are the ONLY school that offers a flexible schedule for students with children or full time jobs providing morning, afternoon and evening classes. Students only need to attend school for the classes they need to graduate. 

Prince George’s County Public Schools proposed budget for school year 2023 does away with specialty alternative programs in lieu of a North and South hub high school stating that they are providing bigger and better programs. Don’t be fooled! There is no place for our students at the new 9-12 high schools. These hub schools will NOT give them the flexibility or support needed to successfully graduate. Our students will end up in online Edgenuity classes in which they lack the motivation needed to finish classes. Thousands of at risk youth will fail to graduate high school if CBC is shut down! 

Sign our petition now to SAVE CBC!!! WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT!!! Reach out to the Prince George’s County Board of Education today to stop the shut down of specialty alternative programs and specifically Community Based Classroom (CBC)! At risk youth NEED OPTIONS!!  

“There is just no other school like CBC based in the community in Prince George’s County, Maryland for students who need another chance.  CBC really gave me a different mind set for things in the future. CBC really helped me raise up my grades higher than I ever expected them to be. So honestly, CBC would be a great decision for other students who need another chance without any reminders of their past mistakes. Not only am I graduating from high school but now I am looking at attending college.” ~Current Student Erik L.

View CBC’s website here: https://schools.pgcps.org/communitybasedclassroom/

Petition details: https://www.change.org/p/prince-george-s-county-board-of-education-save-community-based-classroom-alternative-high-school-now

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PGCPS Laurel High School Student’s Eco-Activism Has Global Reach

Javier Fuentes, president of the Laurel High School Green Club, gives a thumbs up to the environmental initiatives that helped recertify Laurel as a Green School in Maryland. Courtesy photo by Cinthia Najera.

Editor’s Note: Taking climate lessons from the classroom to the community, Maryland students are becoming increasingly vocal, marching in protests, organizing rallies and challenging school and government authorities to act on their concerns.

Many have been inspired by Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, who, at 15 in 2018, staged daily protests outside the Swedish Parliament with demands that leaders listen to her pleas for the planet.

This month we profile three Maryland teenagers, each a leader among their peers seeking to address solutions to a global crisis.

They are part of a growing youth movement, impatient and frustrated, yet empowered by the sum of their collective effort to create a more equitable and sustainable future.

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By Rosanne Skirble: – On a Friday last winter, Javier Fuentes, then a sophomore at Laurel High School in Prince George’s County, was in his bedroom attending virtual school.

After classes he had a commitment.

Javier was the only student invited to join a global sustainability panel among educators from Scotland, Australia, Kenya, Mexico, Germany and the United States.

The online event was sponsored by the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education, the non-profit that certifies green schools across Maryland.

“I was nervous, intimidated,” he admitted, but Javier gathered his nerves and forged ahead.

“I was never really involved or passionate about the environment until I was a freshman and decided to join the Green Club,” he said in his remarks to the more than 100 people registered for the event, all environmental educators or professionals in the field.

As a member of the club’s executive team that year, Javier facilitated two messy compost audits with expert help from the Smithsonian.

“Ninety percent of the [so-called] waste was actually compostable,” he said.

“It was fun, educational, and a gross experience,” he said, recalling the hands-on sorting.

Those efforts jump-started Laurel’s composting program, the first in any Prince Georges County school. In 2020, the program was recognized with a Waste Diversion Award for Innovation from the Prince George’s Department of the Environment.

By sophomore year, Javier was Green Club president with an executive team, three faculty advisors, and 50 to 60 students who showed up regularly to meetings.

During the pandemic, under Javier’s leadership, the Green Club didn’t slack off and instead accelerated, creating a recycled art competition and getting dozens of students to take a pledge for America Recycles Day.

“There is nothing flashy about him, and he never grandstands. Although he has a quiet personality, he is liked and respected by other students,” said English teacher Beth Gallagher, faculty co-sponsor of the club. “He guided the Club through a strange year of online meetings and at home projects.”

Javier also spearheaded Laurel’s Green School recertification process, Gallagher said.

Nadisha Clayton, another faculty co-sponsor, was impressed by Javier’s critical thinking and encouraged him to join the Envirothon, the largest high school education competition in North America.

Students study training materials, attend hands-on sessions with local experts, and then compete at the local, state and national levels. After placing second countywide contest in March 2020, the Laurel team advanced to the state competition.

“They performed well enough to be able to secure a $1,500 scholarship for each member of their [five-person] team,” Clayton said.

Javier’s visibility in Prince George’s County earned him an invite from the County Board of Education to comment on the county’s Climate Action Plan.

“Overall, I like doing all of these things,” Javier said, reflecting on a summer job with the National Energy Education Development Project, a national non-profit. He studied insulation, working in small groups online with packaged materials sent to his home in boxes.

“I had no idea about insulation, and the impact windowpanes and drafts have on home energy efficiency,” he said. “There are practical solutions that students like me can take, around their own homes, their own lives, so they can become more sustainable.”

Looking back at last February’s Global Sustainability Panel, Javier also broadened his worldview.  He learned from research scientist M. Carolina Ceballos Bernal, with the Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, a Mexican research food and development institute, that she had created an environmental education curriculum, but there was no public policy in place to enforce it.

Javier said he was inspired that she kept fighting to bring the program to life.

“She was able to make connections with other environmental groups to conduct interviews of communities on how they believed environmental education should take place, train educators, and lobby for education on sustainable development and sustainable schools,” he said. “Those kinds of stories inspire me to continue pushing forward with environmental work in my community, that we have to keep pushing for sustainable development themes in our curriculum.”

While acknowledging that young people get impatient with government inertia, Javier said it is the duty of his generation to slow the wider impact of climate change, which is why each action is important.

“You really have to fight for what you want to get it to happen, building connections, with others with the same passion, that we can all work together to make a better, greener future,” he said.

Even small steps can make a difference, Javier tells others.

“Seeing the little successes is what gives me hope, like using reusable water bottles or turning trash into art, or on a bigger scale like closing the ozone hole, seeing that the world can come together to slow effects of climate change,” he said.

But, when he thinks about it, it’s his personal story that gives him the courage to lead. His parents immigrated from El Salvador before he was born, escaping violence and poverty. His parents taught him not to waste food and to conserve energy because back home they couldn’t afford a lot.

“They told me about the drastic differences in lifestyle, and that’s part of my environmental experience, why I reflect on my own habits in my day-to-day-life,” he said.

Javier plans to study engineering or architecture after high school graduation in 2023.

Gallagher sees a promising future whatever he decides.

“Look for Javier where remarkable things are happening. At the center of the project, you will find him – kind, intelligent, hardworking, never seeming to do anything and yet, somehow, holding everything together,” she said.

Laurel High School’s Green Team members, including Javier Fuentes, remove invasive species during the Prince George’s County Student Environmental Alliance Summit at Bladensburg Waterfront Park. Courtesy photo by Nadisha Clayton.

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Embattled Prince George’s school board likely to get another facelift

The Prince George’s County Public Schools headquarters in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines)

Bruce DePuyt, Maryland Matters – The Prince George’s County Board of Education has seen many changes over the years.

It has consisted solely of political appointees, it has been all-elected, and it has been — and is currently — a hybrid, made up of both elected and appointed members.

Following a turbulent year, it appears the wheels of change are about to spin again.

A task force empaneled to explore potential changes in the structure of the school board has tentatively recommended doing away with the board’s four appointed members.

If the recommendation is adopted, the current board — made up of nine elected and four appointed members, along with a student member who votes on some matters — would be replaced with a new all-elected board. It would consist of nine members elected by district and a student chosen by their peers.

Members should be limited to two four-year terms, according to the task force.

In addition, the board would elect its own chair and vice-chair. Currently the chair is appointed by the county executive.

County Executive Angela D. Alsobrooks (D) created the task force last year in the wake of a tumultuous set of meetings that saw the board’s factions battle repeatedly. Those skirmishes — primarily between chair Juanita D. Miller and a progressive bloc — led to the filing of numerous ethics complaints. Multiple board attorneys resigned.

Among the other recommendations announced last week:

  • An increase in school board salaries, from the current $18,000 per year to $27,000.
  • An increase in the board chair’s salary, from $19,000 to $32,000 annually.
  • A requirement that board members attend educational conferences and engage in professional development.
  • A requirement that members engage in “self-evaluation” and “accountability.”

The task force’s recommendations will be the subject of a public hearing on Jan. 19.

During the 2018 campaign, candidate Alsobrooks urged a return to an all-elected board.

“I still feel that,” she said on Friday. “They’re looking at best practices from around the country. We thought that this was an intelligent way to move forward.”

“We didn’t break the school board,” she added. “This has been an issue that has been with us for so long.”

Alsobrooks said she expects to receive the task force’s final report in February. Any changes to the structure of the school board would require state legislation. The executive said she will ask the Prince George’s delegation to craft a bill to advance those concepts she supports.

Sean T. Coleman, chair of the task force and a Bowie State University professor who teaches educational leadership, stressed that the recommendations announced this week are “only preliminary,” and he encouraged the public to participate in next week’s hearing.

“While we will report out some potential, preliminary recommendations, they are up for adjustments or revision or refinement,” he said. “As well as everything else that is on the chopping block or discussion block.”

Via Maryland matters

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Prince George’s Co. students to return to classrooms after temporary transition to virtual learning

Upper Marlboro: By Scott Gelman – Prince George’s County, Maryland, parent Patrick Paschall said he and other parents were dancing on the neighborhood street corner upon learning that students would resume in-person learning this week.

Virtual learning, Paschall said, has been difficult. His wife’s job requires her to go into the office most of the time, leaving Paschall to watch his kindergartner and second-grader. He finds himself juggling meetings and other requests with making sure his kids have the resources they need to participate in virtual classes.

It’s often a daunting task because his second-grader has lunch at 10 a.m. and recess immediately after, and the kindergartner has lunch at 11 a.m., followed by recess.

“It’s a juggle, and it’s a struggle,” Paschall, who is also running for a state delegate seat, said. “My kids were really frustrated a lot of the time because their technology didn’t work, or they couldn’t find the pieces that they need, or they took a longer break than they realized they were supposed to.”

Still, Paschall and other parents have said the circumstances were better than the alternative: sending students into school buildings as omicron spread rapidly throughout the D.C. region.

On Tuesday, Prince George’s County students will return to the classroom for the first time in nearly a month. In December, school system CEO Monica Goldson announced a plan that included a temporary transition to virtual learning for the whole county, citing a rise in coronavirus cases, a move no other D.C.-region school system made.

In a letter to families last week, Goldson said, “My goal remains to keep our schools open safely, and I believe that we can do so for the duration of the 2021-22 academic year by following the science and proven mitigation strategies: Wear a mask. Stay home if you are sick.”

Ahead of the return to school, Goldson also announced new mitigation measures, including providing students and staff with free test kits and KN95 masks. The county is also planning to expand the number of students selected to participate in its pooled testing program, Goldson said.

Goldson’s decision has become a talking point in nearby D.C. and Montgomery County, where parents have praised the decision and urged leadership to consider doing the same. In D.C., grade levels and classes have been closed on a case-by-case basis. In Montgomery County, County Executive Marc Elrich has called for additional virtual options.

Tania Fuentes, a parent with five students in county schools, said while her older children are independent, the younger ones struggled with virtual learning. She praised teachers, who she said are concerned “with the child’s mental well-being.”

“I am so proud of Prince George’s County Public Schools because they did the right thing,” Fuentes said. “I know that being employed in a different county, I’m pretty disappointed in my employer for not making the same call. I know that other counties are also looking at Prince George’s as the example for virtual.”

Timothy Meyer, president of Mt. Rainier Elementary’s parent-teacher organization, said he was relieved at the decision to have two weeks of virtual learning after winter break because the school was one of the last in the county to report positive coronavirus cases before winter break.

“The two cases were reported on the Monday and Wednesday after we switched to virtual learning,” Meyer said. “I don’t have any doubt that had we actually been in school for that last week before the holiday, there would have been many more exposures. People would have had to be in quarantine over the Christmas holiday.”

And Meyer and Paschall want the school system to go a step further, calling for the county to require students and staff to be vaccinated. Goldson acknowledged she received a petition on the matter, Paschall said.

“As a parent, I will feel most comfortable when 100% of people within a PGCPS building are vaccinated,” Meyer said. “That really is kind of the pivot point, that really is the tipping point for myself and a lot of other parents.”

Paschall said he’s hopeful the school system’s approach will help limit spread.

“We know that there will probably be some glitches in their implementation because there are,” Paschall said. “We need to be as understanding as we can, but also, we have to be doing something in order to make sure that our kids are safe, and their teachers are safe.”

Via WTOP

The Prince George’s County Public Schools headquarters in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines)

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Community Activists Call for Transparency in Prince George’s Police Oversight

Some Prince George’s County residents who testified before the state legislature helping create sweeping police reform throughout Maryland are questioning how Prince George’s County

By Tracee Wilkins – Demonstrators circled the Prince George’s County executive’s office building Thursday calling for transparency in police oversight.

The Maryland General Assembly passed legislation in its 2021 session requiring the creation of police accountability boards.

Some Prince George’s County residents who testified before the state legislature helping create sweeping police reform throughout Maryland are questioning how Prince George’s County is implementing new state requirements for improving law enforcement.

“We’re simply saying, ‘County executive, let’s do it right,’” said Dawn Dalton, cofounder of the JustUs Initiative.

The Maryland General Assembly now requires law enforcement agencies to have police accountability boards made up of community members. The state provided a basic framework, but the rest is up to each locality.

“It’s the work of the people that we want to get done not how they want it to get done without our input,” said Tamara McKinney, cofounder of Concerned Citizens for Bail Reform.

Earlier this month, County Executive Angela Alsobrooks tweeted asking interested people to submit resumes, leading some to wonder what happened to the rest of the process.

“For Prince George’s County to just recruit for a board that has no structure around it and no one really knows what’s really going on, that just seams haphazard,” said Beverly John of Maryland Coalition for Justice and Police Accountability.

In Calvert County, there have been public meetings for creating the board that allowed community input before discussing appointments.

That’s what activists like Nikki Owens want in Prince George’s County. 

“My cousin William Green is a prime example of why rushing this is a poor choice,” Nikki Owens said.

Prince George’s County police Cpl. Michael Owen is charged with shooting and killing Green. Owen pleaded not guilty. He has a long history of questionable actions that appeared to have gone unchecked, and additional lawsuits have been filed against him and the county.

“Basically, this man did all of his crimes as a police officer, so he gets away with it,” Owens said. “My cousin wasn’t the first person he’s killed.”

Alsobrooks says the county is ahead on police reform because of its task force that reviewed its department two years ago.

“Prince George’s is ahead of all of those counties, and we have a task force that we formed in 2020, so we are not behind anybody in terms of working on this issue,” she said.

The county executive’s office says it’s drafting legislation for the board that will require a public hearing and there will also be public hearings for each board appointment as well.

Via NBC 4

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Clinton man arrested in fatal Christmas Eve shooting of PGCPS Parent

professional boxer Danny Kelly, Jr.,was a PGCPS Parent who was killed on Christmas eve in a district characterized by out of control fights within and outside it’s school system.

Clinton, Maryland: (Reform Sasscer)- Prince George’s County police said Friday they’ve arrested a Clinton, Maryland, man in the fatal shooting of a PGCPS parent who was a pro boxer on Christmas Eve.

Markell Lewis, 25, faces 36 charges, including first-degree murder, second-degree murder and multiple counts of attempted murder in the death of 30-year-old Danny Kelly J.

Police said the motive was road rage, and that Lewis confessed to the Temple Hills shooting.

“Our detectives were resolute in their determination to find Mr. Kelly’s killer who had no regard for anyone’s life when he opened fire on Christmas Eve. We hope this arrest offers his devastated family a bit of comfort as they continue to mourn this loss,” Police Chief Malik Aziz said in a statement.

The shooting happened on Dec. 24, when Kelly was driving northbound on St. Barnabas Road in Temple Hills with his girlfriend and three children to a holiday dinner around 4:40 p.m. An SUV pulled up alongside Kelly’s truck, and someone inside the vehicle opened fire.

Detectives said the SUV was a GMC Envoy, and that a family member of Lewis is the registered owner.

According to police, Lewis was later arrested on Dec. 27 on St. Barnabas Road for felon in possession of a gun. The gun that was recovered was linked to Kelly’s shooting death.

Police said they arrested Lewis on Thursday at his home in Clinton. He’s being held without bond.

Authorities are still looking for the GMC Envoy.

The police are asking anyone who has more information to call detectives at 301-516-2512. Callers wishing to remain anonymous may call Crime Solvers at 1-866-411-TIPS (8477), or go online at www.pgcrimesolvers.com, or use the “P3 Tips” mobile app (search “P3 Tips” in the Apple Store or Google Play to download the app onto your mobile device). Refer to case number 21-0059930.

At least 10 juveniles were killed last year in Prince George’s County, Maryland which was the worst year since 2008.

County Executive Alsobrooks has implored the community to come together to “disrupt the cycle of violence that is growing again.”

According to Alsobrooks, for example, there have been 162 carjackings in Prince George’s County. She acknowledged on Tuesday this week and said that juveniles are responsible for 96 of them.

“And so this tells us a lot about where we’re headed. And we must do something right now to disrupt it,” Alsobrooks said.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system. These willful violations include closing down schools ready for real estate option, paying off lawyers, siphoning money off to friends and family etc. Prince George’s county citizens must raise up and demand answers without delay. These out of control fights and other purposeful disregard are not fair to county residents, their families and United States.

Read more >>> Washington Post

>>>Read more here >> Major Drama as Fights Break Out at Suitland High School and others.

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