Tag Archives: Pgcps Mess

Save PGCPS Community Based Classroom Alternative High School NOW!!

Upper Marlboro, Saccer Building: – Reform Sasscer – A change.org petition has been launched to plead and reach out to the Prince George’s County Board of Education to stop the shut down of specialty alternative programs and specifically Community Based Classroom (CBC)! At risk youth need option!

It reads:   

“Community Based Classroom (CBC) alternative high school has been successfully working with at risk seniors to earn their high school diplomas since 1989. The school has graduated thousands of students that would not have received a high school diploma without this program in place. We cater to the at risk 5th and 6th year senior who failed to graduate at traditional high schools. 

The data speaks for itself! With a graduation rate of 95% and an attendance rate of 93% (school year 2019-20) it is clear that our program works! By providing highly qualified teachers to deliver engaging in person instruction our students are motivated to gain the skills they need to get their diplomas and make a plan for their futures. We are the ONLY school that offers a flexible schedule for students with children or full time jobs providing morning, afternoon and evening classes. Students only need to attend school for the classes they need to graduate. 

Prince George’s County Public Schools proposed budget for school year 2023 does away with specialty alternative programs in lieu of a North and South hub high school stating that they are providing bigger and better programs. Don’t be fooled! There is no place for our students at the new 9-12 high schools. These hub schools will NOT give them the flexibility or support needed to successfully graduate. Our students will end up in online Edgenuity classes in which they lack the motivation needed to finish classes. Thousands of at risk youth will fail to graduate high school if CBC is shut down! 

Sign our petition now to SAVE CBC!!! WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT!!! Reach out to the Prince George’s County Board of Education today to stop the shut down of specialty alternative programs and specifically Community Based Classroom (CBC)! At risk youth NEED OPTIONS!!  

“There is just no other school like CBC based in the community in Prince George’s County, Maryland for students who need another chance.  CBC really gave me a different mind set for things in the future. CBC really helped me raise up my grades higher than I ever expected them to be. So honestly, CBC would be a great decision for other students who need another chance without any reminders of their past mistakes. Not only am I graduating from high school but now I am looking at attending college.” ~Current Student Erik L.

View CBC’s website here: https://schools.pgcps.org/communitybasedclassroom/

Petition details: https://www.change.org/p/prince-george-s-county-board-of-education-save-community-based-classroom-alternative-high-school-now

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Embattled Prince George’s school board likely to get another facelift

The Prince George’s County Public Schools headquarters in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines)

Bruce DePuyt, Maryland Matters – The Prince George’s County Board of Education has seen many changes over the years.

It has consisted solely of political appointees, it has been all-elected, and it has been — and is currently — a hybrid, made up of both elected and appointed members.

Following a turbulent year, it appears the wheels of change are about to spin again.

A task force empaneled to explore potential changes in the structure of the school board has tentatively recommended doing away with the board’s four appointed members.

If the recommendation is adopted, the current board — made up of nine elected and four appointed members, along with a student member who votes on some matters — would be replaced with a new all-elected board. It would consist of nine members elected by district and a student chosen by their peers.

Members should be limited to two four-year terms, according to the task force.

In addition, the board would elect its own chair and vice-chair. Currently the chair is appointed by the county executive.

County Executive Angela D. Alsobrooks (D) created the task force last year in the wake of a tumultuous set of meetings that saw the board’s factions battle repeatedly. Those skirmishes — primarily between chair Juanita D. Miller and a progressive bloc — led to the filing of numerous ethics complaints. Multiple board attorneys resigned.

Among the other recommendations announced last week:

  • An increase in school board salaries, from the current $18,000 per year to $27,000.
  • An increase in the board chair’s salary, from $19,000 to $32,000 annually.
  • A requirement that board members attend educational conferences and engage in professional development.
  • A requirement that members engage in “self-evaluation” and “accountability.”

The task force’s recommendations will be the subject of a public hearing on Jan. 19.

During the 2018 campaign, candidate Alsobrooks urged a return to an all-elected board.

“I still feel that,” she said on Friday. “They’re looking at best practices from around the country. We thought that this was an intelligent way to move forward.”

“We didn’t break the school board,” she added. “This has been an issue that has been with us for so long.”

Alsobrooks said she expects to receive the task force’s final report in February. Any changes to the structure of the school board would require state legislation. The executive said she will ask the Prince George’s delegation to craft a bill to advance those concepts she supports.

Sean T. Coleman, chair of the task force and a Bowie State University professor who teaches educational leadership, stressed that the recommendations announced this week are “only preliminary,” and he encouraged the public to participate in next week’s hearing.

“While we will report out some potential, preliminary recommendations, they are up for adjustments or revision or refinement,” he said. “As well as everything else that is on the chopping block or discussion block.”

Via Maryland matters

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Prince George’s Co. students to return to classrooms after temporary transition to virtual learning

Upper Marlboro: By Scott Gelman – Prince George’s County, Maryland, parent Patrick Paschall said he and other parents were dancing on the neighborhood street corner upon learning that students would resume in-person learning this week.

Virtual learning, Paschall said, has been difficult. His wife’s job requires her to go into the office most of the time, leaving Paschall to watch his kindergartner and second-grader. He finds himself juggling meetings and other requests with making sure his kids have the resources they need to participate in virtual classes.

It’s often a daunting task because his second-grader has lunch at 10 a.m. and recess immediately after, and the kindergartner has lunch at 11 a.m., followed by recess.

“It’s a juggle, and it’s a struggle,” Paschall, who is also running for a state delegate seat, said. “My kids were really frustrated a lot of the time because their technology didn’t work, or they couldn’t find the pieces that they need, or they took a longer break than they realized they were supposed to.”

Still, Paschall and other parents have said the circumstances were better than the alternative: sending students into school buildings as omicron spread rapidly throughout the D.C. region.

On Tuesday, Prince George’s County students will return to the classroom for the first time in nearly a month. In December, school system CEO Monica Goldson announced a plan that included a temporary transition to virtual learning for the whole county, citing a rise in coronavirus cases, a move no other D.C.-region school system made.

In a letter to families last week, Goldson said, “My goal remains to keep our schools open safely, and I believe that we can do so for the duration of the 2021-22 academic year by following the science and proven mitigation strategies: Wear a mask. Stay home if you are sick.”

Ahead of the return to school, Goldson also announced new mitigation measures, including providing students and staff with free test kits and KN95 masks. The county is also planning to expand the number of students selected to participate in its pooled testing program, Goldson said.

Goldson’s decision has become a talking point in nearby D.C. and Montgomery County, where parents have praised the decision and urged leadership to consider doing the same. In D.C., grade levels and classes have been closed on a case-by-case basis. In Montgomery County, County Executive Marc Elrich has called for additional virtual options.

Tania Fuentes, a parent with five students in county schools, said while her older children are independent, the younger ones struggled with virtual learning. She praised teachers, who she said are concerned “with the child’s mental well-being.”

“I am so proud of Prince George’s County Public Schools because they did the right thing,” Fuentes said. “I know that being employed in a different county, I’m pretty disappointed in my employer for not making the same call. I know that other counties are also looking at Prince George’s as the example for virtual.”

Timothy Meyer, president of Mt. Rainier Elementary’s parent-teacher organization, said he was relieved at the decision to have two weeks of virtual learning after winter break because the school was one of the last in the county to report positive coronavirus cases before winter break.

“The two cases were reported on the Monday and Wednesday after we switched to virtual learning,” Meyer said. “I don’t have any doubt that had we actually been in school for that last week before the holiday, there would have been many more exposures. People would have had to be in quarantine over the Christmas holiday.”

And Meyer and Paschall want the school system to go a step further, calling for the county to require students and staff to be vaccinated. Goldson acknowledged she received a petition on the matter, Paschall said.

“As a parent, I will feel most comfortable when 100% of people within a PGCPS building are vaccinated,” Meyer said. “That really is kind of the pivot point, that really is the tipping point for myself and a lot of other parents.”

Paschall said he’s hopeful the school system’s approach will help limit spread.

“We know that there will probably be some glitches in their implementation because there are,” Paschall said. “We need to be as understanding as we can, but also, we have to be doing something in order to make sure that our kids are safe, and their teachers are safe.”

Via WTOP

The Prince George’s County Public Schools headquarters in Upper Marlboro. (Photo: Maryland Matters/Danielle E. Gaines)

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Returning from virtual learning, PGCPS to distribute masks, test kits to students

The embattled CEO of Prince George’s County, Maryland, public schools Dr. Monica Goldson

Upper Marlboro, Maryland: (Reform Sasscer) – The embattled CEO of Prince George’s County, Maryland, public schools Dr. Monica Goldson said the system will be giving out test kits and KN95 masks as it returns from a distance-learning model on Jan. 18.

CEO Dr. Monica Goldson said in a letter to the community that the school system will aggressively test its student and staff population each week following the return to in-person learning.

Students and staff will receive free test kits and KN95 masks, and students are being asked to submit the results of their tests in order to return to classes each week. A link to upload results will be provided in the coming week, Goldson said.

The school system will also expand the number of students selected to participate in the random testing sample pool each week. Goldson said the school system has worked with vendors to double the number of students the program can test each week to 20% of the student population.

She asked families to sign the permission slip to allow their child to take part in the testing program.

“I understand that families may have concerns about returning due to the uncertainties of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Goldson said. “We will continue to collaborate with the local and state health departments to assess data and make the best decisions.”

The county’s K-6 Virtual Learning Program will conclude Jan. 28, as Goldson explained the program was always meant to be a temporary option while vaccines were unavailable to children ages 5-11.

No spectators will be allowed at Prince George’s County Public Schools sporting events in the month of January.

“My goal remains to keep our schools open safely and I believe that we can do so for the duration of the 2021-22 academic year by following the science and proven mitigation strategies: Wear a mask. Stay home if you are sick. Complete the permission slip for your child to be randomly selected for weekly testing. Get vaccinated,” Goldson said.

Goldson did not address the issue of out of control fights and other issues affecting the county school system. At least 10 juveniles were killed last year in Prince George’s County, Maryland. The worst year since 2008.

County Executive Alsobrooks has implored the community to come together to “disrupt the cycle of violence that is growing again.”

According to Alsobrooks, for example, there have been 162 carjackings in Prince George’s County. She acknowledged on Tuesday this week and said that juveniles are responsible for 96 of them.

“And so this tells us a lot about where we’re headed. And we must do something right now to disrupt it,” Alsobrooks said.

Dr. Monica Goldson a CEO for PGCPS who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system. These willful violations include closing down schools ready for real estate option, paying off lawyers, siphoning off money and other violations. Prince George’s county citizens must raise up and demand answers without delay. These out of control fights and other purposeful disregard are not fair to county residents, their families and United States.

Read more >>> Washington Post

>>> Read more >>PGCPS Parent Fatally Shot in Front of his 3 Children, Girlfriend.

>>>Read more here >> Major Drama as Fights Break Out at Suitland High School and others.

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Prince George’s County, Maryland Highest Paid Employees

In 2020 Prince George’s County, Maryland reported 1,404 employees making more than $100,000 per year; by comparison the average salary was $69,747. The highest reported pay for the county was $119.20/HR for Robert Williams, Administrator to County Council-G. Prince George’s County, Maryland in 2020 ranked 59th in the nation among highest paying counties and 1,087th in the nation for overall highest paying employers.

View the top 100 highest paid employees for Prince George’s County, Maryland below.

Prince George’s County, MD – Employee Rankings

Rank  Name  Job Title  Pay  Estimated Yearly Salary  
1Robert WilliamsAdministrator to County Council-G$119.20/HR$247,933 
2Henry StawinskiDirector-L$116.83/HR$243,000 
3George AskewDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$114.68/HR$238,525 
4Angie RodgersDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$112.98/HR$235,000 
5William HuntDeputy Administrator to County Council-G$112.09/HR$233,150 
6Hector VelezDirector-L$109.93/HR$228,644 
7Joy RussellDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$107.36/HR$223,300 
8David VandykeCounty Auditor-G$106.75/HR$222,047 
9Angela AlsobrooksCounty Executive-E$8,423/Bi-Weekly$218,998 
10Tara JacksonChief Administrative Officer-G$104.92/HR$218,225 
11Tiffany GreenDirector-Y$104.81/HR$218,000 
12Mark MagawDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$102.48/HR$213,150 
13Floyd HoltDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$102.48/HR$213,150 
14Jared MccarthyDeputy Chief Administrative Officer-G$100.96/HR$210,000 
15Shawn StokesDirector$100.52/HR$209,090 
16Joseph AdlerPersonal Services Contractor-Time$100/HR$208,000 
17Wanda GibsonDirector$97.60/HR$203,000 
18Stanley EarleyDirector$97.12/HR$202,000 
19Aisha BraveboyStates Attorney-E$7,653.95/Bi-Weekly$199,003 
20Jacqueline RafterryDeputy Director-L$95.17/HR$197,960 
21Robert HarvinDeputy Director-L$95.17/HR$197,960 
22George NicholsDeputy Director-L$95.17/HR$197,960 
23Christopher MurthaDeputy Director-L$95.17/HR$197,960 
24Anthony SchartnerDeputy Director-L$95.17/HR$197,960 
25Maurene McneilChief Zoning Hearing Examiner-G$94.97/HR$197,534 
26Corenne Labbe’Director$93.75/HR$195,000 
27Mary McdonoughDirector$93.75/HR$195,000 
28Elana Belon-ButlerDirector$92.75/HR$192,923 
29Melinda BollingDirector$92.72/HR$192,850 
30Joseph GillDirector$92.23/HR$191,835 
31Jonathan ButlerDirector$92.23/HR$191,835 
32Joyce NicholsZoning Hearing Examiner-G$92.22/HR$191,813 
33Leslie JenkinsAdministrative Specialist 4$92.22/HR$191,813 
34Rajesh KumarPrincipal Counsel to District Council-G$90.94/HR$189,149 
35Darrin PalmerAssistant Sheriff-E$90.90/HR$189,067 
36Rhonda WeaverDirector$90.76/HR$188,790 
37Stephanye Redd-MaxwellCourt Administrator-G$90.15/HR$187,519 
38Donnell TurnerAdministrative Specialist 4$90.15/HR$187,519 
39Brian FrankelDeputy Director-Y$89.64/HR$186,461 
40Alan DoubledayDeputy Director-Y$89.64/HR$186,461 
41James McclellandDeputy Director-Y$89.64/HR$186,461 
42Stephen McgibbonDirector$89.30/HR$185,745 
43Estella AlexanderDirector$88.94/HR$185,000 
44Terry BellamyDirector$87.84/HR$182,700 
45Raymond GilleyDeputy Director$87.50/HR$182,000 
46Gevonia WhittingtonDirector$87.21/HR$181,400 
47Ronald GillDirector$87.21/HR$181,400 
48Michelle RussellDirector$87.02/HR$181,000 
49Turkessa GreenAdministrative Specialist 4$86.95/HR$180,859 
50James KeletiPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
51Kevin HughesPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
52Cedric DickersonPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
53Robert NealonPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
54Jeffrey MitchellPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
55Sunny MrotekPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
56Shawne’ WaddyPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
57Mistinette MintsPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
58Steven YuenPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
59Brian ReillyPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
60Christian PricePolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
61Robert HollandPolice Major$86.52/HR$179,964 
62Jason AbbottPrincipal Deputy States Attorney-E$85.40/HR$177,625 
63William AlexanderPolice Major$85.03/HR$176,869 
64Lori BrooksAdministrative Specialist 4$84.18/HR$175,088 
65Denise RobinsonAdministrative Specialist$84.13/HR$175,000 
66Warren HughesFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$83.94/HR$174,596 
67Denny ChatelFire Fighter Major-Y$83.94/HR$174,596 
68Theresa GrantAssociate Director$83.64/HR$173,980 
69Behdad KashanianAssociate Director$83.64/HR$173,980 
70Jewell Graves-TuckerAdministrative Specialist 3$83.64/HR$173,980 
71Angela FairAdministrative Specialist 3$83.64/HR$173,980 
72Shelby HendersonAssociate Director$83.64/HR$173,980 
73Glenn MainsAssociate Director$83.64/HR$173,980 
74Gary CunninghamDeputy Director$83.64/HR$173,967 
75Bryan AddisPolice Major$83.57/HR$173,827 
76Anthony ClinePolice Major$83.57/HR$173,827 
77Art’z WatkinsPolice Major$83.57/HR$173,827 
78Corey TruxonPolice Major$83.57/HR$173,827 
79Colette GreshamAdministrative Specialist 4$83.45/HR$173,586 
80Karen Campbell RobinsonAdministrative Specialist 3$83.45/HR$173,585 
81Kameron CoefieldDeputy Director$83.17/HR$173,000 
82Dawit AbrahamDeputy Director$82.82/HR$172,261 
83Major RiddickPersonal Services Contractor-Auto$6,620/Bi-Weekly$172,120 
84Sharon SaundersAssistant Sheriff-E$82.63/HR$171,880 
85Mark RoccaprioreAssistant Sheriff-E$82.63/HR$171,880 
86John CarrAssistant Sheriff-E$82.63/HR$171,879 
87Mark SpencerAdministrative Specialist 4$82.19/HR$170,951 
88Lakina WebsterPolice Major$82.13/HR$170,837 
89Sheniqua SmithPolice Major$82.13/HR$170,837 
90Amber HendricksDeputy Director$81.73/HR$170,000 
91Tiffany HarveyAdministrative Specialist$81.73/HR$170,000 
92Thomas JonesDeputy Director$81.73/HR$170,000 
93Rhea HarrisAdministrative Specialist$81.73/HR$170,000 
94Gary KrichbaumFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
95Christopher HuntFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
96Darren WareFire Fighter Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
97Michael MarinoFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
98Ernest LindqvistFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
99Christian WargoFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 
100James McclellandFire Fighter-Medic Major-Y$81.50/HR$169,510 

See all employees for Prince George’s County, Maryland

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The Reform Sasscer Movement is helping to build a truly public platform, while producing consistent, quality investigations, opinions and analysis. The Reform Sasscer Movement cannot survive and grow without your participation. Now, more than ever, it is vital for The Reform Sasscer Movement to reach as many people as possible. Your support helps protect The Reform Sasscer Movement’s independence and it means we can continue keeping the democratic space free, open and robust. Every contribution, however big or small, is so valuable for our collective future.

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Former County Councilmember Karen R. Toles is set to fill a vacant seat as a Delegate.

former County Councilmember Karen R. Toles

Largo, Maryland: (Reform Sasscer) – In a cleverly crafted scheme to get like minded folks in public office, the Prince George’s Democratic Central Committee on Tuesday January 4th selected former County Councilmember Karen R. Toles to fill a vacant seat in the Maryland House of Delegates.

Her selection was “by acclamation,” said Central Committee Chairman Kent Roberson. Her name will be forwarded to Gov. Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R), who by law has 15 days to make the appointment official.

Toles, a lawyer, will fill the District 25 seat that came open when Dereck E. Davis (D) was selected to replace Nancy K. Kopp (D) as state treasurer in controversial episode of high level public corruption.

Toles had previously filed to run as a candidate in District 25, having been added to a slate that includes incumbent Sen. Melony Griffith (D) and Dels. Darryl Barnes (D) and Nick Charles (D).

She served two terms on the council, from 2010 to 2018, representing District 7, which overlaps with the legislative district.

In a statement announcing the slate last month, Griffith called Toles “an established fiscal leader known for her community engagement, advocacy for seniors and outstanding constituent services is poised join the team and hit the ground running on behalf of District 25.”

Toles works as community affairs director for the Prince George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office.

Prior to serving on the council, she was senior policy advisor for AFSCME and regional field director for the Democratic National Committee.

During her tenure on the council, she gained notoriety for an incident in which she was observed by police driving more than 100 miles an hour and swerving between cars on the heavily traveled Capital Beltway in 2012.

She was charged with reckless driving and other offenses, but she was given probation before judgement and allowed to retain her license.

Toles will serve the final year of Davis’s four-year term and she is expected to be challenged big time in the next election cycle.

Former school board member Edward Burroughs III (D) attracted 199 vote

Burroughs posts big lead in low-turnout Council race

A small crowd of Prince George’s voters went to the polls on Tuesday to cast primary ballots for a County Council vacancy that was created when Monique Anderson-Walker (D) resigned to run for lieutenant governor on a ticket headed by Comptroller Peter V.R. Franchot (D).

Just over 100 people voted in-person on Tuesday; 191 people cast ballots during early voting.

Former school board member Edward Burroughs III (D) attracted 199 votes, 68% of the 294 ballots cast. Former County Councilmember Tony Knotts (D) received 51 votes, 17% of the electorate. Four other candidates accounted for the other 15%.

The tally does not include 2,200 mail-in ballots. Those votes will be counted in two canvasses: on Thursday and Jan. 14.

Burroughs served for a dozen years on the board of education, a panel he joined at age 18. Over time he emerged as the leader of a progressive group of board members who clashed loudly and often with school board president Juanita D. Miller, an appointee of County Executive Angela D. Alsobrooks (D). Burroughs was heavily supported by union activists in the brief campaign, which was largely waged over the holidays and was widely ignored by the public.

Whoever wins the primary will be the only candidate to appear on the Feb. 1 special general election ballot, as no Republicans, independents or third party candidates filed to run for the District 8 vacancy. However, that is bound to change in the future credible election. So far, only 10% of eligible voters turned out for this special election – clearly not a good demonstration of Democracy. It’s critical that the county residents figure out how to get more citizens to vote. Hopefully Mr. Burroughs will do a better job for the county than he did for the school board. We hope he will challenge the public corruption perception involving the unions including AFSCME among others which sponsored him this time around and others involved in cover ups in the county.

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The Reform Sasscer Movement is helping to build a truly public platform, while producing consistent, quality investigations, opinions and analysis. The Reform Sasscer Movement cannot survive and grow without your participation. Now, more than ever, it is vital for The Reform Sasscer Movement to reach as many people as possible. Your support helps protect The Reform Sasscer Movement’s independence and it means we can continue keeping the democratic space free, open and robust. Every contribution, however big or small, is so valuable for our collective future.

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‘Hope in Action’: Prince George’s Co. launches new anti-crime effort

County Executive Angela Alsobrooks told the press on Tuesday that the county is offering grants to nonprofits that help keep people away from crime — up to $50,000.

Largo, Maryland: (Reform Sasscer) – Maryland’s Prince George’s County is working on new efforts to curb violence, particularly among young people.

County Executive Angela Alsobrooks told the press on Tuesday that the county is offering grants to nonprofits that help keep people away from crime — up to $50,000.

Among the services the county is looking at through “Hope in Action” is youth mentoring, diversion, reentry and employment services, Alsobrooks said after reviewing our blog post from yesterday.

“We want to really encourage people to please apply to be able to provide those services to our youth,” she said. “We have a task force that is being formed as well to make sure that we’re also meeting the demand, and really counteracting the violence in our community.”

Alsobrooks also said there are mental health concerns when it comes to violence, as well as addiction.

“We know that many of our young people need mentors and others in their lives. And those are the resources that we are providing as a government. But we know that this issue cannot be resolved at the police station, it will not be resolved at the courthouse, it’s going to be resolved in our community,” the county executive who wants to be reelected said.

She implored the community to come together to “disrupt the cycle of violence that is growing again.”

According to Alsobrooks, for example, there have been 162 carjackings in Prince George’s County. She acknowledged and said that juveniles are responsible for 96 of them.

“And so this tells us a lot about where we’re headed. And we must do something right now to disrupt it,” Alsobrooks said.

Applications for the grants are open until Jan. 14.

Prince George’s county public schools (PGCPS), has experienced a spike in fights recently among its student population countywide which saw county schools being closed in December last year (2021) due to fights and covid-19 related issues combined.

On or around November 15th, 2021, a teenager was found shot in the middle of the afternoon Saturday. Authorities identified the victims as 16-year-old Quincy Barnes of Upper Marlboro. While he was found near his home on the 13800 block of Ascott Dr. in Upper Marlboro, police said they believed the shooting happened near the 13500 block of Fenway Lane.

The teen’s family told the press at the time that they were grieving and wanted answers.

A classmate of the victim described him as quiet saying he couldn’t imagine him initiating any violence.

Family also spoke about their concern about surging violence countywide. On or around November 12, 2021, a 14-year-old survived being hit by a stray bullet. Police say the teen was playing video games in his room at his Beltsville apartment building.

Police say starting last year they’ve seen a disturbing trend when it comes to crime and kids.

“The main things that we see that’s the most concerning to us is really the increase in juvenile crime, whether it’s juveniles committing the crime or juveniles being the victim of the crime,” said Cpt. David Blazer, assistant commander of Major Crimes for PGPD, in an interview last October 2021.

This is the deadliest year in the county since 2008.

At least 10 juveniles were killed last year.

Dr. Monica Goldson who was selected through public corruption has never spoken publicly about the out of control fights and public corruption sweeping quietly through the school system which includes closing down schools ready for real estate option. Prince George’s county citizens must raise up and demand answers. These out of control fights are not fair to them and their families.

>>>Read more here >> Major Drama as Fights Break Out at Suitland High School and others.

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Support Reform Sasscer Movement:

The Reform Sasscer Movement is helping to build a truly public platform, while producing consistent, quality investigations, opinions and analysis. The Reform Sasscer Movement cannot survive and grow without your participation. Now, more than ever, it is vital for The Reform Sasscer Movement to reach as many people as possible. Your support helps protect The Reform Sasscer Movement’s independence and it means we can continue keeping the democratic space free, open and robust. Every contribution, however big or small, is so valuable for our collective future.

Donate Now

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15-year-old family member arrested in killing of Clinton mother, 8-year-old son

15-year-old family member arrested in killing of Clinton mother, 8-year-old son

Clinton, Maryland: (Reform Sasscer) – A 15-year-old family member of a mother and her young son who were killed Thursday in a shooting in Clinton, Maryland, has been arrested. He has been charged in their deaths as an adult, Prince George’s County Police said last Friday.

At around 5:50 p.m. Thursday, police were called to a home in the 8500 block of Wendy Street, where a shooting had been reported. Once they got to the scene, officers found 44-year-old Taledia Oxley and her son, 8-year-old Asa Oxley, suffering from gunshot wounds.

They were pronounced dead on the scene.

A third victim, an adult male, had also been shot. He was taken to a nearby hospital for injuries that police said were “not considered life-threatening.” That victim is also a member of the family of the suspect and victims.

Patrol officers found the 15-year-old in the neighborhood. He has been charged with first- and second-degree murder and first- and second-degree attempted murder, among other charges. He has admitted to the shootings.

The motive is under investigation.

Those who have information about the case are being asked to call Prince George’s County detectives at 301-516-2512. Those who want to remain anonymous can call 1-866-411-8477 (TIPS) or submit a tip online.

Prince George’s county public schools (PGCPS), has experienced a spike in fights recently among its student population county wide which saw county schools being closed in December last year (2021) due to fights and covid-19 related issues combined. >>>Read more here >> Major Drama as Fights Break Out at Suitland High School and others.

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Former Prince George’s delegate Angela Angel enters 4th District congressional race

Former Dels. Angela M. Angel (D), District 25 will seek the Democratic nomination to succeed Rep. Anthony G. Brown (D-Md.) in Maryland’s 4th Congressional District.
Angel, a lawyer worked on legislative policy. During her tenure in Annapolis, spoke of being grabbed, touched or treated inappropriately, without giving details or naming the perpetrators. Angel is expected to revisit and name names. This is the only way to change Annapolis General assembly once she becomes congresswoman. She is expected to challenge and change the culture of the congress.  

Bowie, Md, (Reform Sasscer) – Former Prince George’s delegate Angela M. Angel will seek the Democratic nomination to succeed Rep. Anthony G. Brown (D-Md.) in Maryland’s 4th Congressional District, she announced in a video Monday.

Angel, who served in the General Assembly from 2015 to 2019, will take on fellow current and former Prince George’s officials in the Democratic primary after Brown announced that he would not seek reelection and instead run for Maryland attorney general next year. During her tenure in Annapolis in the general assembly, Delegate Angel faced sexual harassment together with three other female lawmakers. At that time, the Three female lawmakers told a legislative panel in Annapolis that they’ve experienced sexual harassment while in office and called for an independent investigator to handle harassment complaints in the Maryland General Assembly.

In her campaign video, Angel highlighted her rise from a stint of homelessness in 2012 to her election to the House of Delegates in 2014, where she became a vocal advocate for victims of domestic violence, citing her own experiences.

“In June of 2012 I found myself in a homeless shelter, nine months pregnant, escaping an abusive marriage,” she said. “I know what it’s like to get knocked down. I also know what it takes to stand back up. By June 2014 I went from homeless to the House of Delegates, where I authored and passed bills protecting survivors of domestic violence, providing mental health services for our children and holding companies accountable for overcharging seniors for prescription drugs.”

If elected, Angel said, she would also prioritize fighting for universal prekindergarten and developing the Pennsylvania Avenue corridor that runs through the district. She also said she would work to bring the FBI headquarters to the district as federal officials consider a new location — a project that lawmakers in Maryland and Virginia have been jockeying to build in their districts in anticipation of major economic benefits.

She joins Del. Jazz Lewis (D-Prince George’s) and former Prince George’s state’s attorney Glenn Ivey in the Democratic primary. James Curtis Jr. is also running for the nomination.

There are reports, Glenn Ivey should step down in favor of one of the other candidates running for office as his family already controls all three branches of government. According to the doctrine of separation of powers, the U.S. Constitution distributed the power of the federal government among these three branches, and built a system of checks and balances to ensure that no one branch could become too powerful. With Glenn Ivey’s wife Jolene Ivey ​currently representing Council District 5 and their son Del. Julian Ivey who is a member of House of Delegates since January 9, 2019. It will be fair to give a chance to another family or families to wand off wide spread corruption in the county.

Given the deep-blue shade of the district, the Democratic primary is likely to attract more funds and energy than the general election. The district includes a large swath of Prince George’s, plus parts of Anne Arundel County — newly including Annapolis after the General Assembly passed a revised congressional map this month as part of the redistricting process.

Delegate Jazz Lewis will also seek the Democratic nomination to succeed Rep. Anthony G. Brown (D-Md.) in Maryland’s 4th Congressional District.
Mr. Glenn Ivey should step down in favor of one of the other candidates running for office as his family already controls all three branches of government.

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